Date Published: 2 October 2005

Call for research funding to prevent pregnancy complications (USA)

Health News from the United States of America (USA)

Health News from the USA

U.S. State representatives and senators have received a call for more research funding to prevent pregnancy complications. This came from a Yale School of Medicine researcher at the 7th annual Women In Government regional conference on September 28.

The incidence of preterm birth and low birthweight infants are the most pressing obstetrical issues today, in addition to the malpractice crisis, according to Michael Paidas, M.D., associate professor and director of The Program for Thrombosis and Hemostasis in Women's Health in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine.

Paidas' talk included strategies for diagnosis, management and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes. He pointed out the important role of risk assessment with fetal fibronectin and cervical length as strong predictors of preterm birth. He also outlined what legislators can do to improve overall pregnancy outcomes and long-term women's health.

" We know now that complicated pregnancies have long-term consequences for women's health, particularly cardiovascular disease,"
said Paidas, one of 60 national researchers, health care professionals, state representatives and senators attending the conference.
" We need more federal funding to understand this complex set of diseases in order to prevent poor pregnancy outcomes and treat complicated pregnancies."

Paidas added,

" The cost of caring for premature infants is over $15 billion in the newborn period alone. The malpractice crisis is limiting the number of physician scientists dedicated to reproductive medicine, and drastically reducing the number of obstetricians to deliver care to our patients."

Women In Government President Susan Crosby said,

" Women In Government is excited to bring this important issue to the attention of our legislative members in the Eastern Region. We look forward to continuing our work on pregnancy management and pre-term delivery in the future."

Source(s): Yale University, Connecticut (USA).

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