Date Published: 4 April 2007

Red meat linked to breast cancer - Leeds University

Eating red meat increases a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer, according to new research from the University of Leeds.

The findings are most striking for post-menopausal women – those with the highest intake of red meat, the equivalent to one portion a day (more than 57 grams) - run a 56% greater risk of breast cancer than those who eat none. Women who eat the most processed meat, such as bacon, sausages, ham or pies, run a 64% greater risk of breast cancer than those who eat none.

Researchers at the University’s Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics have been tracking the eating habits and health of more than 35,000 women for the past seven years, and their latest findings are published in the British Journal of Cancer. Earlier findings, widely reported in January, showed that pre-menopausal women who have the greatest intake of fibre have cut their risk of breast cancer in half.

 

 

Source: Leeds University (UK).

Also in the News:

HFEA consults on ways to reduce avoidable problems for IVF babies - 4 Apr '07

Irish eggs almost totally free from Salmonella - 4 Apr '07

Canadian Government support *Vital markers for a safer living environment* (UNICEF) - 4 Apr '07

Irish Aid Strategic Partnerships with UN development agencies (UNICEF) - 3 Apr '07

UK Healthcare watchdog praises pathology departments for fast test turnarounds - 3 Apr '07

Sunburnt holiday-makers boost their chances of fatal skin cancer - 3 Apr '07

Can hearing voices be a good thing ? (Manchester University) - 3 Apr '07

Antisocial behaviour in boys leads to poor health in men (MRC) - 2 Apr '07

One can always choose to respond with love, the most powerful force of all ...

Although care has been taken when compiling this page, the information contained might not be completely up to date. Accuracy cannot be guaranteed. This material is copyright. See terms of use.

IvyRose Holistic 2003-2019.