Date Published: 4 July 2011

Do protein-based sport drinks benefit athletes' performance ?

Health News from the United Kingdom (UK).

Researchers have suggested that some protein-based sport drinks are of no benefit to the performance of athletes.

The sports drink industry makes millions of pounds from selling drinks and other supplements to people who want to increase their energy and stamina while exercising. However, when scientists reviewed the effects of some such supplements they found that they offered no more benefits than the protein found in a normal balanced diet.


Dr James Betts reviewed the results of all existing research into the effects of supplements containing carbohydrate and protein. He said:

" While many carbohydrate drinks are often appropriate for individuals keen to enhance their performance, claims that protein can be of similar benefit are simply not supported by firm scientific evidence.
_Aside from these proposed effects during exercise, many supplement manufacturers claim that supplementing our diets with added protein may help the body to adapt to physical training. Protein is of course an essential part of our diets but even athletes who are training hard will almost certainly get more than enough protein from the food they eat.
"

Dr Betts' review of the available evidence, due for publication in the current issue of Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise, identifies that much of the research into these supplements has been conducted on people in the morning who have not been allowed to eat anything for a number of hours, so food in any form might be expected to be beneficial. He said:

" There is a need for more evidence showing whether these supplements can be useful under 'real-world' conditions, such as following exercise later in the day when usual meals will have already provided the necessary nutrients."

Dr Betts said that people considering the use of such supplements should be aware of the strength of evidence supporting the desired effects and that this should be balanced against the possible risks. He added:

" An analysis of around 600 over-the-counter nutritional supplements was conducted a few years ago and it was found that 10-20% were contaminated with anabolic hormones not stated on the label, mostly testosterone and nadrolone, with supplements purchased on the UK market at the upper end of this range (19%).This alone suggests that the decision about whether or not to consume any supplements requires an evidence-based risk-benefit approach and we should not be surprised if any personal experimentation results in muscle gain which could be entirely unrelated to the listed ingredients."

 


Source: Bath University, England.
http://www.bath.ac.uk

Also in the News:

Cranberry Harvest underway in USA - 5 Oct '18

The higher prevalence of hypertension in black compared with white Americans has been linked with fried and highly processed food - 5 Oct '18

Total retail sales of herbal supplements in the USA exceeded $8 Billion in 2017 - 13 Sep '18

It's a bumper blueberry season - 13 Jul '18

Child undernutrition in Mali - 5 Jul '18

U.S. FDA takes steps to advance health through improvements in nutrition - 27 Jun '18

New portable test for and vitamin A and iron deficiencies - 6 Dec '17

How much whole grain is needed in a healthy diet? - 14 Nov '17

Angels encourage us to develop mental, spiritual and emotional clarity.

Although care has been taken when compiling this page, the information contained might not be completely up to date. Accuracy cannot be guaranteed. This material is copyright. See terms of use.

IvyRose Holistic 2003-2018.